How Your Focus Can Change Your Life

 

People don’t read.

If you are lucky, they will scroll slowly.

People don’t listen.

If you are lucky, they will eavesdrop.

Is this a consequence of being surrounded by relentless noise in our daily universe?

Is this a sign of a deteriorating intelligence?

Is it simply bad manners gone viral?

What is lost is an unimaginable amount of meaningful connections, synergies, serendipities, and masterpieces.  By not investing fully in the moment you are in, whether you are talking to someone, tying your shoelace, writing your novel or talking a walk, your energy is dissipated leaving you with a fleeting shell of an experience.

What if you didn’t carry around a hundred thoughts in your head or multitask your way through your day?  What if you just did one thing and told yourself that was OK?

I did an experiment years ago to see if I could devote 30 days, one month, one entire January, to memorize one Beethoven piano sonata.

Piano Sonata in D major, Op. 28 “Pastorale”

Composed: 1800-1801, dedicated to Count Joseph von Sonnenfels

To make that happen, I had to rearrange a few things in my life.  I found myself practicing 2 hours a day.  I didn’t realize when it happened but soon I found myself at the piano 4 – 6 hours, comparing recordings of Vladimir Ashkenazy (the Bruce Springsteen of the classical piano world in my opinion), and Maurizio Pollini, and humming the melodies from each movement in the shower.  To get the music into my fingers and my muscle memory, I played the music over and over by rote, starting from the last section and working my way backwards to the beginning.  I felt the shape of the music in my hands, the sound of it in my ears, every note became a familiar vibration.

An odd thing happened during this month.  As the music deepened, it filled every part of my life, everything else became a background.  I had a big purpose, a wonderful goal and something inside of me squared its shoulders and said, “You can do this.  You must do this for every sonata, every thing you want to make your own.”  I loved what I was doing.

That was the true gift of those 30 days.  Knowing what it takes and actually living it, doing it, breathing it and making space in my life to make it happen was a life changing experience for me.

People are capable of doing anything they want to but are often so unwilling to do the one thing it takes to make it happen.

What is that?

Focus.

This way of being will take you deep into the one thing you choose to do.  You will be tempted by distractions, friends, a million excuses to abandon your solitary pursuit.  You will be thinking about lunch, bingewatching something on Netflix, knocking off a little bit earlier to go to the gym.

“Focusing is about saying No.” Steve Jobs

But like most things in life that are worth doing, turning your focus inward, tuning out the temptations and taking yourself deeper in your work will bring you to that place known as “the zone” or “flow” where you will love being and doing what you are passionate about.

 

“The successful warrior is the average man, with laser-like focus.” Bruce Lee

Here’s 3 things you can do to get started:

Choose one thing.

What is one thing you would love to do?  Give yourself the gift of making that happen.  Choose something you feel you can accomplish in a set amount of time.  I love all of the Beethoven piano sonatas but there are a lot of them so I chose one to memorize,

 

Give yourself a number.

For me 30 days was a good amount of time and January was a good time of the year – post holiday, pre spring. It is easier to convince your mind to do something for a limited amount of time.

Tell someone what you are doing.

Once your project is outside of you, it becomes a stronger reality.  The person you share this with will keep you accountable, cheer you on and pick you up when you fall.

“The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.” Alexander Graham Bell

Focus is your superpower.  You can do anything when you use it.